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Crate Packaging History Massachusetts


Crate History in Massachusetts

The first documented writings in the US about shipping crates is in a 1930 handbook (Technical Bulletin No. 171) written by C. A. Plaskett for the US Department of Agriculture although his writing imply that crates were defined before that time. C. A. Plaskett was known for his extensive testing and defining of various components of transport packaging.

Construction of Wood Crates

Although the definition of a wooden crate as compared to a wooden box is clear, construction of the two often results in a container that is not clearly a crate or a box. Both wooden crates and wooden boxes are constructed to contain unique items, the design of either a crate or box may use principles from both. In this case, the container will typically be defined by how the edges and corners of the container are constructed. If the sheathing (either plywood or lumber) can be removed, and a framed structure will remain standing, the container would likely be termed a crate. If removal of the sheathing results in no way of fastening the lumber around the edges of the container, the container would likely be termed a wooden box.

Crates can be made of wood, plastic, metal or other materials. The term ‘crate’ often implies a large and/or strong container. Most plastic crates are smaller and are more commonly called a case or container. Metal is rarely used because of its weight. When metal is used, a crate is often constructed as an ‘open crate’ and may be termed a ‘cage’. Although a crate may be made of any material, for these reasons, the term ‘crate’ used alone often implies one constructed of wood.

Design of Crates

There are many variations of wooden crate designs. By far the most common are ‘closed’, ‘open’ and ‘framed’. A Closed Crate is one that is completely or nearly completely enclosed with material such as plywood or lumber boards. When lumber is used, gaps are often left between the boards to allow for expansion. An Open Crate is one that (typically) uses lumber for sheathing. The sheathing is typically gapped by at various distances. There is no strict definition of an open crate as compared to a closed crate. Typically when the gap between boards is greater than the distance required for expansion, the crate would be considered an open crate. The gap between boards would typically not be greater than the width of the sheathing boards. When the gap is larger, the boards are often considered ‘cleats’ rather than sheathing thus rendering the crate unsheathed. An unsheathed crate is a frame crate. A Frame Crate is one that only contains a skeletal structure and no material is added for surface or pilferage protection. Typically an open crate will be constructed of 12 pieces of lumber, each along an outer edge of the content and more lumber placed diagonally to avoid distortion from torque.Ship Wooden crates

When any type crate reaches a certain size, more boards may be added. These boards are often called Cleats. A cleat is used to provide support to a panel when that panel has reached a size that is may require added support based on the method of transportation. Cleats may be placed anywhere between the edges of a given panel. On crates, cleat placement is often determined by the width of the plywood used on plywood sheathed crates. On other crates, cleats are often evenly spaced as required to strengthen the panel. Sometimes two cleats are added across the top panel of a crate placed as needed to give the top of the crate added strength where lifting chains or straps may press on the crate while lifting.

Cleats may have more specific names based on added benefit they provide. Some published standards only use those more descriptive terms and may never refer to these various lumber components as cleats. For example, lumber placed under the top of a wood container to add support for a large top are called “joists”. Lumber is built into the mid-section of the top of a wood container to strengthen the top are called “cleats”. When the cleats are enlarged and constructed to support a large top, they may generically be termed “cleats” or more specifically be termed “joists”.

“Skids” or thick bottom runners, are sometimes specified to allow forklift trucks access for lifting.

Transportation methods and storage conditions must always be considered when designing a crate. Every step of the transportation chain will

result in different stresses from shock and vibration. Differences in pressure, temperature and humidity may not only adversely affect the content of the crate, but also will have an effect on the holding strength of the fasteners (mostly the nails and staples) in the crate.

Although the above definition most always stands true, there are many slightly altered or ‘sub-definitions’ used by and in various organizations,

agencies and documents. This is the result of the small size of the industry and the fact that a single, finite definition of an item that is different every time it is made can be difficult to define.

IATA, the International Air Transport Association, for example, doesn’t allow crates on airplanes because it defines a crate as an open transport container. Although a crate can be of the Open or Framed variety, having no sheathing, a Closed crate is not open and is equally as safe to ship in as a wooden box, which is allowed by IATA.

In general conversation, the term crate is often used to denote wooden boxes and crates simply to shorten the term however in commercial use; the misuse of the term could result in a container that is not suitable for its intended use.

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International Crate Service in Boston MA


Crate Packaging for International shipping, crate for bikes, crates for Industrial parts, crates for bikes, crates for artwork, mainframes Etc..

Neighborhood Parcel can help you package your parcel in the correct container to meet all your exports needs. Our Crating service is second to none. Fast and reliable service for all your shipping needs and within your budget.

Crate Packaging Options

Crates, Boxes, and Containers in Wood, Plywood, Corrugated, or Wood/Corrugated.
Custom Skids and Pallets.

  • Domestic or Export (Certified HT products meeting ISPM 15 guidelines)
  • Assembled or Unassembled (KD)
  • Your Design, Commercial/Military, Single Use or Re-Useable
  • Single Unit or Short Runs
  • Standard or Shock/Vibration Protection
  • Crating / Packing Service at Your Location or Our Shop
  • “Just in Time” or Ahead of Time

Why choose Neighborhood Parcel ®:

  • Fast reliable service: 24Hrs Turnaround.
  • High quality products.
  • Custom fit jobs, no one size fits all approach.
  • On location service.
  • Convenience: One company to crate and ship your parcel.
  • Unmatched Customer service.
  • Rock bottom pricingContact us today!
Boston International shipping business

Lowell Shipping Center


Neighborhood Parcel International Shipping Center

Offering Tips to make your next international shipment smooth and affordable:
1. Choose the Right Box
Use a box that is strong enough to protect the contents and large enough to leave space for adequate cushioning. You can also buy various sizes of boxes, as well as padded mailers, mailing tubes, and other packing materials at the store. If you choose a previously-used box, make sure you remove or cross out any old shipping labels, and make sure the box is in good shape, with no weak spots or cracks. Old or new, make sure the box is made of heavy, corrugated cardboard. Thinner boxes, such as most shoe boxes or gift boxes are not strong enough for shipping.

2. Protect and Pack
Don’t skimp on cushioning material. You can use shredded or crumpled newspaper, bubble wrap, or Styrofoam™ peanuts, or even plain air-popped popcorn. Pack items tightly to avoid shifting, and make sure the cushioning material covers all sides of the object. 
If you’re shipping several items together, wrap each one separately and provide enough cushioning to prevent movement. Fragile items need extra protection: For extra identification, place a return address label inside the package. After packing, gently shake the box. If nothing moves, it’s ready to be sealed.

3. Seal Carefully
A strong seal is essential, so always use tape that is designed for shipping, such as pressure-sensitive tape, nylon-reinforced Kraft paper tape, or glass-reinforced pressure-sensitive tape. These items can be purchased at the store. We recommend you do not use wrapping paper, string, masking tape, or cellophane tape. 
Make sure you seal the center seams at both the top and the bottom of the box securely. Cover all other seams with tape, and be sure not to leave any open areas which could snag on machinery.

4. Address Correctly
To avoid confusion, put the delivery and return addresses only on one side of the package. Make sure you include the ZIP code and complete street address, including apartment or unit number, if applicable. Also include all these items in your own return address. 
For overseas shipping, include the correct postal codes, city or town, province or state name, and country name.

Do not put the shipping label over a seam or closure, or on top of sealing tape. To avoid ink smudges, you can place a strip of clear packing tape over the address areas. Hollow items – stuff with packing material to avoid damage due to shock. Cover handles or other protruding parts with extra padding and/or cardboard. Extremely fragile glass or ceramics – try double-boxing: pack the item as described, and then place that box in a slightly larger box, with more cushioning material in between the boxes. Framed photographs or artwork – take the glass out of the frame and wrap it separately. Computer equipment, circuit boards and memory – pad well and pack in an Electro Static Discharge (ESD) bag to prevent damaging static buildup. Electronic items – remove batteries and wrap them separately.

Do not mail highly perishable foods such as soft cheeses or meats. Cured dry sausages and hard aged cheeses are fine. Firm baked goods are best, such as cookies, candies, flavored nuts, fudge, breads, unfrosted cakes, and muffins.

Be sure bottled and canned items are tightly sealed in thick containers that won’t break easily.

Foods should be sealed in airtight wrap before putting them into the gift container and the final shipping box. Wrap moist foods separately from crisp ones to preserve their textures.

Pack cakes snugly into tins. Put homemade confections in individual bonbon cups or papers, layered and separated with waxed, parchment, or butcher’s paper. Leave no headroom in the container. If necessary, fill unused space with crumpled wax paper. Pound cakes and loaf breads can be baked and shipped in disposable foil pans after being sealed in plastic wrap.

When shipping more fragile bottles of oils or vinegars, make sure they are tightly sealed. Place inside a plastic zip-top bag, leaving it full of air for added cushioning. Further protect the bottles by wrapping in bubble wrap.

If shipping more than one item, place heavier items at the bottom. Be sure there is ample space between each item, with packing surrounding each on all sides. Shake the box down to be sure there is no head space left unpacked so the contents will not shift. Use a waterproof marker on your shipping address and return labels. Print address and return labels in clear, large print and secure to the container with clear tape. Don’t trust self-sticking or glue labels to stay in place. Ship all food gifts via the fastest method possible.


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